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Linda Lewallen, M.D. 3921 W El Prado Tampa FL 33629

813-391-0516

Lewallen.linda@gamil.com

Ed Pastion--CEO Delta Airlines

Henry Kuykendall VP NYC

Dear Messers: Pastion and Kykendall,

Morbid obesity is a medical term which is the result of overeating and carrying around too many pounds for years and results in significant heart disease.

As a cardiologist/electrophysiologist I treat patients with morbid obesity on a daily basis and am very familiar with this medical condition. As a physician I fly to my job at various hospitals in the country. I am an expert in my field. By the same token, the expectation is that Delta is expert in flying passengers to their destination.

On November 9th, 2016, I boarded the Delta flight from Tampa to Minneapolis Confirmation HAUFID.

I was comfortably seated in my usual and preferred aisle seat. I make this trip to and from work often—usually two round trips per month. Some people drive to work, I fly Delta to and from my job. I was looking forward to my schedule of appointments in the hospital.

Your airline has seating that provides people with a choice including more space, aisle, window, more legroom, et.

al. People can also bring on pets. They can bring on luggage that does not fit and has to be taken off and put in the hold because they did not want to check the bag. A passenger presented himself as the passenger in the middle seat.

He was morbidly obese. Once the man was seated in the middle seated, it became obvious that I would be sharing my seat with him as his leg, his abdomen, and his shoulders were spilling four inches (4”) into my seat.

I had two options, I could lean forward for the entire almost three hour trip or I could lean out into the aisle at the risk of taking a hit to the back of the head by another passenger or the flight crew as they barrel down the aisle with the service cart oblivious to passengers. In any case, I was not going to be able to review my work.

I paid full fare for my preferred aisle seat. Sharing my seat with a morbidly obese passenger was not acceptable.

I immediately requested that the stewardess move the morbidly obese passenger. In case you're not aware, Delta crews no longer wear nametags therefore, I was not able to address her by name nor can tell you with whom I spoke. She did not ask me my name nor address me personally. She was around 45 years old, 5'6" with long dark hair pulled back.

I clearly showed her that I was not able to have full use of the seat for which I had paid full fare.

The stewardess's answer to my request was: "The armrest is down so you have nothing to complain about and you're being very rude calling him morbidly obese".

I tried to explain to the stewardess that when the same thing happened on a transatlantic flight with Lufthansa--the chief purser, name badge and all, came immediately and removed the passenger, apologized to me, stating that “the gate agent should never have allowed the passenger on the plane”. When I got home, a 20% off coupon for my next flight was waiting for me. That was great service and Lufthansa put me, the passenger, first. No questions.

No hassle.

The response from Delta and the non-personal, no name badge, flight attendant, was a call to a Red Coat--Michael J--who had me removed from the plane. The stewardess stated that she was not comfortable traveling with me as “I was a dangerous passenger." I was mortified. I was embarrassed. I was going to be late for my procedures.

I was livid. I was incredulous. I was everything and living a nightmare I have only read about in the newspapers with other women physicians traveling on Delta. If I was so dangerous, why did the Red Coat, Michael, put me immediately on another flight leaving 30 minutes later to Minneapolis via Cleveland?

Delta is very strict about luggage fitting in the overhead bin or under the seat.

Why does Delta not require the passengers to fit into their allotted seat? Why should I be inconvenienced and forced to share my seat with a morbidly obese passenger? Why did he not have to buy two seats? It is unconscionable that passengers should have to put up with this when the seat is chosen and paid for.

Morbid obesity is not going to go away, once again it is at epidemic proportions especially when flying.

The seats are smaller and people are larger. Morbid obesity in this case is a man approximately 5”8 and 350 pounds--. Perhaps you should start screening for morbid obesity instead of overweight luggage as it surely affects the weight and balance of an airplane.

You could make more money by letting those of us who are normal weight buy our special seats and those who are overweight buy two seats. No passenger should ever have to share his or her seat on any flight especially when paying full fare and selecting a seat in advance.

It is for the safety and comfort for both the overweight passenger and others.

It would be wonderful if you could find the stewardess on that flight and teach her how to handle conflict and let her know that my concern for my safety and that of the other passengers was my primary interest.

Delta Airlines has not only humiliated me by having me removed from a plane when I was traveling to work, they severely inconvenienced me as I was approximately four hours late to work.

More importantly, I need to know the legal ramifications of this incredibly

Create smarter documentsabusive treatment by Delta Airlines. Will I be singled out on other flights as a “dangerous passenger” and a risk to have aboard your flights? Do I lose my frequent flyer miles? Will I have a black star next to my name and have to be wary of flying your airline because I might be singled out on future flights,?

Will I lose my Pre TSA status?

I would appreciate an immediate reply to this letter.

Sincerely,

Linda Lewallen MD

Linda Lewallen, M.D.

3921 W El Prado

Tampa FL 33629: 813-391-0516 Lewallen.linda@gamil.com

Linda Lewallen

Dec 10, 2016, 6:42 PM

to me

letters is Delta Air Lines Inc., P.O. Box 20706, Atlanta, GA 30320.

---------- Forwarded message ----------

From: Linda Lewallen

Date: Sat, Dec 3, 2016 at 4:22 PM

Subject: Delta Airlines letter

To: Linda Lewallen Linda Lewallen, M.D. 3921 W El Prado Tampa FL 33629:

813-391-0516

Lewallen.linda@gamil.com

P.O. Box 20706, Atlanta, GA 30320.

Edward Bastion

President Delta Airlines

P.O.

Box 20706

Atlanta,GA 30320

Dear Mr. Bastion,

Morbid obesity is a medical term which is the result of overeating and carrying around too many pounds for years and results in significant heart disease. As a cardiologist/electrophysiologist I treat patients with morbid obesity on a daily basis and am very familiar with this medical condition. As a physician I fly to my job at various hospitals in the country.

I am an expert in my field. By the same token, the expectation is that Delta is expert in flying passengers to their destination.

On November 9th, 2016, I boarded the Delta flight from Tampa to Minneapolis Confirmation HAUFID. I was comfortably seated in my usual and preferred aisle seat. I make this trip to and from work often—usually two round trips per month.

Some people drive to work, I fly Delta to and from my job. I was looking forward to my schedule of appointments in the hospital.

Your airline has seating that provides people with a choice including more space, aisle, window, more legroom, et. al. People can also bring on pets.

They can bring on luggage that does not fit and has to be taken off and put in the hold because they did not want to check the bag. A passenger presented himself as the passenger in the middle seat. He was morbidly obese. Once the man was seated in the middle seated, it became obvious that I would be sharing my seat with him as his leg, his abdomen, and his shoulders were spilling four inches (4”) into my seat.

I had two options, I could lean forward for the entire almost three hour trip or I could lean out into the aisle at the risk of taking a hit to the back of the head by another passenger or the flight crew as they barrel down the aisle with the service cart oblivious to passengers.

In any case, I was not going to be able to review my work.

I paid full fare for my preferred aisle seat. Sharing my seat with a morbidly obese passenger was not acceptable. I immediately requested that the stewardess move the morbidly obese passenger. In case you're not aware, Delta crews no longer wear name tags therefore, I was not able to address her by name nor can I tell you with whom I spoke.

She did not ask me my name nor address me personally. She was around 45 years old, 5'6" with long dark hair pulled back. I clearly showed her that I was not able to have full use of the seat for which I had paid full fare.

The stewardess's answer to my request was: "The armrest is down so you have nothing to complain about and you're being very rude calling him morbidly obese".

I tried to explain to the stewardess that when the same thing happened on a transatlantic flight with Lufthansa--the chief purser, name badge and all, came immediately and removed the passenger, apologized to me, stating that “the gate agent should never have allowed the passenger on the plane”. When I got home, a 20% off coupon for my next flight was waiting for me.

That was great service and Lufthansa put me, the passenger, first. No questions. No hassle.

The response from Delta and the non-personal, no name badge, flight attendant, was a call to a Red Coat--Michael J--who had me removed from the plane. The stewardess stated that she was not comfortable traveling with me as “I was a dangerous passenger." I was mortified.

I was embarrassed. I was going to be late for my procedures. I was livid. I was incredulous.

I was everything and living a nightmare I have only read about in the newspapers with other women physicians traveling on Delta. If I was so dangerous, why did the Red Coat, Michael, put me immediately on another flight leaving 30 minutes later to Minneapolis via Cleveland?

Delta is very strict about luggage fitting in the overhead bin or under the seat. Why does Delta not require the passengers to fit into their allotted seat? Why should I be inconvenienced and forced to share my seat with a morbidly obese passenger?

Why did he not have to buy two seats? It is unconscionable that passengers should have to put up with this when the seat is chosen and paid for.

Morbid obesity is not going to go away, once again it is at epidemic proportions especially when flying. The seats are smaller and people are larger. Morbid obesity in this case is a man approximately 5”8 and 300 pounds a BMI of 46.

Perhaps you should start screening for morbid obesity instead of overweight luggage as it surely affects the weight and balance of an airplane.

You could make more money by letting those of us who are normal weight buy our normal seats and those who are overweight buy two seats. No passenger should ever have to share his or her seat on any flight especially when paying full fare and selecting a seat in advance. It is for the safety and comfort for both the overweight passenger and others.

It would be wonderful if you could find the stewardess on that flight that had me removed and teach her how to handle conflict and let her know that my primary interest was for the safety of all the passengers.

Delta Airlines has not only humiliated me by having me removed from a plane when I was traveling to work, they severely inconvenienced me as I was approximately four hours late to the scheduled procedures and I was exhausted by being treated so badly.

More importantly, I need to know the legal ramifications of the incredibly malevolent treatment by Delta Airlines. Will I be singled out on other flights as a “dangerous passenger” and a risk to have aboard your flights?

Will I have a black star next to my name and have to be wary of flying your airline because I might be singled out on future flights? Will I lose my Pre TSA status? Do I lose my frequent flyer miles?

Now, September 2019, when I want to use the Voucher, Delta tells me it is out of date and they will not honor it.

Dear Mr. Bastion,

Delta certainly has a talent for insulting their passengers.

Enclosed is a letter I wrote following a horrible experience on a Delta Flight in November 2016. As you can see, I had the audacity to request that a morbidly obese man be placed somewhere where he was not forcing me to share my seat with him. Please know that I was taken off the flight two weeks before another physician was dragged off the plane by Security Guards on a United flight bloodying his nose. I believe the Delta flight crew would never have asked me to get off the flight if it was following the other passenger's horrible experience.

Roger Salz, Executive Assistant in a goodwill gesture gave me a Voucher for $647.20.

To be honest, I was so disgusted with Delta that I have not flown Delta again for almost three years. Today, when I finally decided to use the voucher for a flight to Europe, I was told by Perlie Brachett, Supervisor, that Delta would only honor half of the voucher because it had expired. I asked Ms Brachett to be escalated to one of her supervisors. She refused to escalate, then called back leaving a voice mail with a general number 800-455-2720 which after a 40 minute wait is not being answered.

This voucher was not issued because Delta had over sold seats and I had a choice of taking a later flight.

It was issued because I had a "negative experience" as per Mr. Salz. There is no expiration on a a voucher of this nature. Mr.

Bastion, this repeat very insulting experience in Delta's customer service is more than disappointing especially when the letter ends with " We....look forward to serving you soon". I certainly hope you will follow through and re issue the full value of the voucher.

Reason of review: Poor customer service.

Monetary Loss: $647.

Preferred solution: Honor the $647.20 voucher you gave me..

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Anonymous
#1784974

I would like to know how Pissed Consumer got the above letter which was sent to Delta Airlines. If Delta thinks it is funny to publish a private letter I sent to Delta on line then they have shown their true colors.

This level of incompetence is not surprising from the likes of Delta. So glad I have other choices now.

Great job Delta. Very professional and mature way to handle customer service.

Anonymous
#1786886
@Anonymous

You're joking right... The OP posted it.

Kindred
#1789738
@Anonymous

No actually, I'm not joking. Pearlie Brachette (yes, that is the name she gave me), the customer service person at Delta who refused to reinstate the $647 from Delta (fortunately she was overruled) is the most likely person to have forwarded this communication. So what is "OP"?

Anonymous
#1783829

His assets were Super-Sized from eating too much junk food from McDonald"s and similar crap fast food places. Also due to a very sedentary lifestyle of sitting around watching the soaps all day.

Anonymous
#1781934

I would absolutely agree that if someone encroaches too far into the next seat they should be moved or asked to purchase a 2nd seat. I am overweight myself and I always do this as a courtesy.

That said, if you used the term "morbidly obese" out loud in front of this passenger and made that big of a scene I question your profession.

I wouldn't pay you 5 cents to be my doctor if this is all the compassion you are able to muster. Sometimes you just quietly accept it and move on for the sake of not humiliating another person for no good reason other than a bit of comfort.

Anonymous
#1749826

You are clearly a hateful, disgusting person and everything that is wrong with this world. While I am in full agreement that morbidly obese people should pay for two seats on a plane for the comfort of those around them, asking a person to be moved and therefore humiliating them with the flight attendant is unnecessary.

Here's my question...did you ask the gentleman himself if he would mind moving? You know..treat him like a human being?

I'm going to guess no. A little kindness goes a long way but for many it's just too darn hard.

Lionel
#1753498
@Anonymous

It is Delta's responsibility to have a policy regarding this, AND to enforce it, thereby not putting the onus on passengers to have to deal with this. 40% of adults in the U.S.

are obese. This requires a policy.

Anonymous
#1781937
@Lionel

Delta does have a policy. If the armrest is down, the passenger is considered to fit into the seat. That said, that doesn't explain why you couldn't have tried to politely deal with the man himself instead of going to the flight attendant.

Anonymous
#1784462
@Lionel

Glad someone actually sees where the responsibility lies, with Delta and not the passenger.

Kindred
#1789739
@Anonymous

I am so glad you have such a strong opinion. My first guess is that you yourself are morbidly obese, one of the ones we cannot fit onto an xray table because you're too fat.

When I did ask the morbidly obese man to move as he was spilling over into my seat he answered--"Not my problem". I got up and went and spoke quietly to the stewardess who promptly started screaming at me.

You see she too was morbidly obese FYI that is a medical term in common use these days and in fact it is a diagnosis for which we get paid. So sorry you don't like the term.

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